Top 8 business benefits of more Chinese workers

Top 8 business benefits of more Chinese workers

Recently the Australian Government made moves to increase the number of Chinese workers coming to Australia. This is good news for business. There are significant direct business benefits to be gained by employing more skilled and semi-skilled Chinese workers. Plus, we will all enjoy the wider economic spin offs of improved infrastructure and more spending.

Two new schemes include the introduction of:
Work and Holiday Arrangement (WHA) Visas; and
Investment Facilitation Arrangements /strong>(IFAs).

Work and Holiday Arrangement (WHA)
Australia will shortly grant visas for up to 5,000 young Chinese work and holiday makers annually. The WHA visa will allow the holder to: stay in Australia for 12 months from their date of first arrival; work for the 12 month duration of their stay, but for no longer than six months with any one employer; and study for four months.

Business benefits:
1. 5000 tertiary educated, English speaking, young Chinese people will be looking for employment for up to 6 months.
2. These young people must bring at least AUD $5000 spending money with them.
3. The WHA will increase demand for tourism services and support the development of Australia’s tourism sector, particularly in rural Australia.
4. Boost the income of Australia’s tertiary education sector.

Investment Facilitation Arrangements (IFAs)
IFAs allow Chinese companies registered in Australia (at least 50% Chinese owned) to import Chinese workers for the duration of large infrastructure projects above $150 million. The scheme will work within the existing visa regime.

Business benefits:
5. Unlike the current Temporary Work (Skilled) visa, there is no requirement to prove that there is a skill shortage or that the project company has had recruitment difficulties in enticing Australian workers.
6. The project company can negotiate via a private contract with the Department of Immigration to import Chinese workers to work on the project in lower skilled occupations.
7. Chinese workers will need to be employed in compliance with Australian labour laws, but concessions can be made with regards to the required standards for English skills.
8. Overall investment in infrastructure will increase bringing more prosperity.

For business and employment consulting services please contact The Eighth Village on 1800 8VILLAGE or via email.

10 tips for expanding your business into Australia

Lisa Cohen
Managing Director
The Eighth Village

Contact via email or call 1800 8VILLAGE

(进入澳洲市场:给中国企业的10个建议)

You have decided to expand our business into Australia. Great decision.

The key to success is using the best Australian professional services available.

Do your research, planning and much of your decision-making before you embark.

Be prepared to pay for good professional advice, it will save you money and heartache many times over.

Be adaptable, flexible and take a long-term view of business success.

Having guided many business people to success, these basic tips will put you ahead of the competition:

1. Establish the right business entity Consider carefully which structure best suits your business needs. It is very difficult to change the legal set up once you start operating. Seek the advice of a corporate lawyer. The four main Australian business types are: sole trader, partnerships, trusts and companies. Companies in Australia must be registered with the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC). If you want to set up a company, you can operate as a foreign company, set up a new Australian company or establish a new Australian subsidiary that also operates as an Australian company. Do also think about a partnership arrangement or a joint venture with an entity experienced in the Australian market. This may increase your chances of success.

2. Do your Market Research Do not assume Australians understand what you are doing or the benefits of your product or service. Use effective marketing to win the hearts and minds of people and do it well. Also ensure your product is of a very high standard and be aware of your competition. Research market developments, trends and forecasts, as well as information on peers and competitors in the Australian market. Take heed of local marketing advice.

3. Consider the impact of the Australian political system and Community Groups Understand the requirements of the various levels of government. Also be aware of possible community opposition within the community and the concerns they may have e.g. environmental groups or the indigenous community. Community groups can hold great power over the success of business ventures.

4. Employ locally to bridge the gaps. For example, if you are coming from a Chinese speaking country, employ Australian-born Chinese who understand the complexities and culture of the Australian market. These people will also fast track your networking reach.

5. Comply with Australian Employment law The Fair Work Act 2009 is the main source of industrial relations regulation for companies operating in Australia and applies to all employees in private sector employers. The FW Act contains ten minimum employment conditions known as the National Employment Standards (NES), which apply to all employees. Use these as the basis for employing locally.

6. Comply with Work Health and Safety Requirements Australian work health and safety legislation requires you to protect your workers and others both at their place of work and in the course of work carried out by your business. This legislation is much stricter than in many Asian countries and the penalties, fines or imprisonment, for not complying can wipe out your business. In addition, you must provide workers’ compensation insurance coverage for your employees.

7. Be aware of cultural differences Australians tend to be fairly tolerant of other business cultures. Do not worry excessively about this but here are a few pointers. Strong eye contact in Australia is a sign of sincerity and trustworthiness. Though Australians are relaxed in their manner and may be on a first name basis upon meeting you, it does not mean they take their business interactions lightly. In Australia, meetings start on time. If you are running late for an appointment, always let the person know you are running late as early as possible. Also do not answer your mobile phone, or send text messages, in a meeting unless it is urgent. In this case, politely excuse yourself and leave the room to answer.

8. Quickly build a Network One of the most overlooked tips for success is a strong network. In Australia you may have little or no network. Get to work early on building one. People to people communication is important. Join local networking groups for example: Rotary, China Chamber of Commerce, Australia China Business Council and the American Chamber of Commerce.

9. Ensure that you enter the country on the right visa Use the services of a qualified migration lawyer and agent to secure you the correct visa. There are many visas some of which are more suited to business professionals than others.

10. Lastly, but most importantly, support your family. If you are bringing your family with you make sure they receive support to find good schools, a lovely home, and friends.